New Podcast: MacAdmins Episode 1

While I was in London for MacADUK, Charles Edge and I started talking about adding a Podcast to the MacAdmins community, and as it happened, we weren’t the only ones who wanted to start something new. Adam Codega from Upserve, Dr. Emily Kausalik, Jason Miller from Thumbtack, Marcus Ransom from RMIT, Pepijn Bruienne from University of Michigan, and John Kitzmiller from Fastly all wanted to chip in, and we’re going to rotate through hosts on the show as we go.

First episode is now posted, and it’s Adam, Dr. Emily, Charles and myself, talking a bit about iOS 9.3, Apple’s Ethernet Drivers, and Google SSO, before we sat down for an interview with the Organizing Committee of the Penn State University Mac Admins conference.

Come on out and listen!

Techno Bits vol. 63: The Transmission Problem

This week’s edition of Techno Bits is now out in the wild, and this week I’ve written about the ransomware trojan that was embedded in Transmission 2.90 by an unknown party who both had an Apple code-signing certificate and access to Transmission’s web server. That’s a huge threat vector, so it might be time to start thinking about using Extinguish on a full-time basis.

Also included are the latest update to Munki-in-a-Box, and some thoughts about the nature of web security, and the state of my iPad Pro fascination.

Techno Bits Special: Apple, Encryption, the iPhone 5C, and what it all means

A special edition of Techno Bits due to yesterday’s court events surrounding the iPhone and Encryption:

Late yesterday, Apple released a letter to their customers, signed by CEO Tim Cook, concerning device encryption. Earlier in the day, a Federal Court, at the request of the Department of Justice, issued a technical assistance order to Apple to get them to comply. The phone belongs to a deceased person accused of shooting a number of people in an attack on a county facility in San Bernardino, California, and the iPhone 5C is locked. The FBI would like access to the locked device, presumably to determine whether the deceased was part of a terrorist cell, acting alone, or something even far more nefarious. Given the FBI’s mandate, it is not a surprise that they want access to the phone.

While this particular request is grantable (and attacks against A7 phones and later is not), it shouldn’t be granted, because we should not be giving anyone the ability to crack a locked iPhone, because developing those tools is admitting that they should be given to any government, not just ours.

Techno Bits vol. 60: Packaging Isn’t (Quite) Dead

This week in Techno Bits vol. 60: Packaging Isn’t (Quite) Dead yet, some feedback on last week’s issue that sparked a lot of commentary. There are updates to the idea of a future without packages and why we might not be there just yet that you should catch up on. I’ve also got a download of my favorite talks from MacADUK, as well as some commentary on the nature of getting ahead vs. doing good.

Techno Bits vol. 53: 2015 Finale

In the final volume of Techno Bits for 2015, there’s a reminder of how important community is to our common interest, some news of changes afoot in Microsoft Office 2016 for the Mac, and a bunch of good links (Wi-Fi Keys! The Pixel C! Airwatch’s REST API! Craig Federighi!)

I’ll have a state-of-the-product post up next week on the future of Munki in a Box.